Feedback -- If, when and how much?

11 years ago | Ryan A. Span (Member)

What level of feedback do you get/use on your creations? Do you just upload it hot from the presses or can you not bear to have it seen by the public until it's been through at least 3 proofreaders? Also, in your feedback, do you seek out positive reinforcement or honest critique?

Regards,
Ryan

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Responses

  1. allantmichaels (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    I post within three minutes of being done. I'd rather get it out in the world. I welcome all critiques, but it helps if honest critique is phrased in a manner that is constructive. I've had a couple of points that were absolutely dead on - but phrased in such a manner that I was initially turned off and even though I made the changes, I was feeling resentful as I did it.

    Of course, I still need to work on improving some of my work, to account for criticisms I've received. I tend to take note, and work it into my future writing. Now, I need to go back and correct the prior work.

  2. EJ Spurrell (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    Well, to be honest, Children of the Halo is already finished. At least the first draft. The entirety of the first draft was posted (as I wrote it) on deviantart.com, and it's been read through by a few people, but the revision I've been posting has been much different in a variety of ways. (Got rid of some characters, tightened up various plot elements, renamed people, places & things.)

    The feedback I've gotten thus far since I've started posting the revisions on Celephi has been nil, but feedback isn't my big concern.

    So far as critique goes, however, I believe the only way you'll get better at writing is if people are brutally honest with you. Showing the story to friends doesn't always cut it, because (unless they too write) they're more prone to say "Hey, good job!" while your grammar, spelling and characters are total crap and wouldn't stand up to an even moderately decent critique. (As I learned when I first started writing.)

    However, that's not to give any right to be rude when critiquing other's works. Mature, informed critique is the way to go about it. That, I'd take seriously. Rude critiques, however, just go into the trash...

    In my opinion, anyway. ;)

  3. Cory Cramer (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    My current serial Losing Latitude has been through a full editing process, but with future work I'll probably have 3 drafts of my own, and then 2+ proofreaders.
    I welcome all feedback as long as I feel the readers' intention is to try to make the work better. Even if I personally disagree with something, it's always good to know how readers feel about it. Most of the time I agree with critiques, so it hasn't been much of an issue.
    I've only censored one comment so far, which was nothing more than a snotty remark about the layout of the site.

  4. Big Melly Mills (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    I think one of the most important things a professional writer can have is a thick skin when it comes to critiques and reviews. Listen carefully, consider them thouroughly, and then decide whether they have a point that you can use to improve your writing or just a difference of opinion that you'll choose to respectfully ignore.

    We have a few pairs of eyes on GGR drafts but more is always better. Maybe we can set up a web fiction critique group!

    Giant Girl Rampages - 18 Feet Tall...and Blogging!
    http://bigmellymills.blogspot.com
  5. Ryan A. Span (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    bigmelly, the Gryphonwood Press writing group which we've recently set up accepts web fiction, 'specially since I'm the admin. ;)

    You're all quite welcome to join up.

    For myself, I always like to get some honest critiques from people whose opinions I trust, people I know won't be too gentle. I can't stand uploading anything that hasn't seen at least one other pair of eyes.

    Regards,
    Ryan

  6. Stormy (Moderator)

    Posted 11 years ago

    I rely on my own proofreading - and if a mistake is pointed out to me, I'll happily correct it.

    That's for the web though - when it comes to the physical editions, there's going to be an author edit (the on-paper) edit, then we're throwing it at an editor (who we've already lined up :) ).

  7. Big Melly Mills (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    Thanks Winter. I'll check it out. How many members will be in the group, do you know?

    Giant Girl Rampages - 18 Feet Tall...and Blogging!
    http://bigmellymills.blogspot.com
  8. Ryan A. Span (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    At the moment we've got 3 members and more are expected to sign up over the next few days. We've not set an upper limit, but we are prepared to stop recruiting if it becomes overcrowded.

    I'm working out a comprehensive ruleset for the group which will be posted later today.

    Regards,
    Ryan

  9. Lucy Weaver (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    I upload my stories as I write them and tend to rely on my own relatively good spelling to pull me through. I tend to get feedback on most stuff from a few friends and not much feedback otherwise. The most comprehensive feedback I've had has probably been from reviews on this here site or Pages Unbound. I adore the positive reviews (who doesn't?) but end up spending a lot more time thinking about the critical ones, seeking out why someone thinks that way about my work and whether I need to change things up to account for it.

  10. Sonja Nitschke (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    I always upload my posts hot from the presses, mainly because I don't have someone to do a quick read through of it beforehand.

    I prefer honest, constructive critique, though praise is always welcome as well. :p

    Those who believe in telekinetics, raise my hand. -- Kurt Vonnegut
  11. Kyt Dotson (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    Since a lot of my work goes to press—in a literal sense—I put it through a couple proofreaders, a series of beta readers, sometimes a critique group, and a copy editor… And even thing, I still have the random typo and grammar bug make it through. A bit embarrassing when someone notices (and it’s actually in print) but I’ve learned to get over it.

    I write Vexations partially to keep my skill sharp, so critiques and feedback are pretty important to me. It does also serve as my resume to the rest of the world of what I do and can do, so it’s also important to me that it’s in pretty good shape when the public meets it.

    I also have a small cadre of beta readers who see chapters before they’re send through the editing washboard—just to get emotional feedback on direction and characters. I do this when I have a lot more time to prepare things for press.

    The more public works that I have developing for display, the less editing time that I spend on them…but recently life has been such that I end up with a lot of down time between writing and publishing phases.

    I strongly prefer honest, straightforward critiques—even if the errors are embarrassing, I do want them fixed.

    http://www.blackhatmagick.com
    BLACK HAT MAGICK vol 2: TANGO & CACHE - Not your ordinary detective agency
  12. Ryan A. Span (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    kyt,

    That's a lot of willing support you got there! Can you spare anyone for another writer's beta team? ;)

    Regards,
    Ryan

  13. Kyt Dotson (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    I just realized that I forgot something important to help explain my expansive editorial network: I'm dyslexic. I'd say that I'm "mildly" dyslexic; but then everyone who knew me when I was younger would point out that I used to be severely dyslexic, so my idea of what mild is might be skewed from average.

    Winter, I'll see what I can break off and send thy way. Although, it might just end up being me. I can always use another writer's circle at the moment to get some fresh blood circulating.

    By the way, I'm reading STREET and I happen to be a cyberpunk fan. So I'm happy with what I'm seeing.

    http://www.blackhatmagick.com
    BLACK HAT MAGICK vol 2: TANGO & CACHE - Not your ordinary detective agency
  14. Ryan A. Span (Member)

    Posted 11 years ago

    Kyt,

    Thanks, I saw your review, it was much appreciated! STREET's still my baby, the one story that you never want to get away from. Just like my last series. 'Course, she's really growing up now and once I finish the trilogy I'm gonna have to move on.

    I was just kidding around about the beta team, I'd never expect you to give up your readers. If you do want to give and get more feedback, though -- at the risk of sounding like a broken record -- you'd be welcome to join the writing group I've been spamming around for the past week.

    Just scroll up to my other posts on this thread for the link.

    Regards,
    Ryan

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