RRL now offering paid ads

Page: 123

Responses

  1. Billy Higgins Peery (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    I'm curious, does everybody agree that you need to post daily on RRL to see real success, if you don't do ads? What about, like, three times a week? I thought I'd seen some serials gain success w/ less updates, but I'm not sure, so I'd love to hear what the general consensus is.

    "Any number of hitlers, are still not my problem." -Tempest
  2. Chrysalis (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    @Billy No idea, I just know I got waaaay more views back when I updated daily from my backlog.

    I'm ashamed to admit I have no clue about web comics. Do they rely on paid ads? Do those ads pay off in some way? I'm curious.

    Anathema, a web serial about the effect superpowers would have on our world. http://anathemaserial.wordpress.com/
  3. Dary (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    It's not what it was (because of ad-blockers), but a fair few webcomics still use Project Wonderful, which itself was set-up by webcomic artists (the guy who does Dinosaur Comics, I think) to both provide comics with revenue, and give them a chance at advertising themselves outside of the usual popularity listings.

    The last time I was serial-ing, back in 2009-11, I would usually make a couple of dollars a day from ads, which would itself go back into paying to advertise my own site. As for whether it paid off? Well, at my 2010 height I had around two thousand readers, almost all of whom found me via the ads I ran (WFG, by comparison, brought in about twenty readers XD). And the more readers I had, the higher my pageviews, which meant I made more money from advertising and had more to spend.

    As I said before, though, ad-blockers have absolutely gutted the system. Whereas before I could bring in hundreds of visitors a day, my recent forays are lucky to bring in a tenth of that. A fair number of webcomics have stalled, if not outright disappeared, because their owners can no longer afford to keep them going.

  4. Sten Düring (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    @Billy Yes and no.

    Seems to be the way to build an initial readerbase. However, see Change: New World. As in look at the distribution of the 95 'chapters'. I'd argue that an average of 30K+ views per chapter qualifies as succesful.

    Observe that you have to write the 'right kind' of story as well, or daily updates won't build a readerbase.

  5. Blaise Corvin (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    @Chrysalis

    My intention was to publish and monetize my work from the get-go. Advertising is advertising. As I mentioned in another thread, my research has led me to conclude my conversion rate for readers-->book sales online is roughly 20%.

    As such, the more readers I build now, the better my sales will do right off the bat, which may in turn generate more sales.

    The logic is simple. I'm not spending money to validate my ego or anything...

    But if someone was, that wouldn't bother me either. I am not in the habit of dictating how other people should spend their money. Once again, I really don't understand your stance here because the entire train of logic leading to it is alien to me.

    Visit my site, http://www.blaise-corvin.com. I have punch and pie.
    I also have two stories: Delvers LLC and The Crimson Artifice. :)
  6. Chrysalis (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    @Blaise Corvin where'd you find the data suggesting those figures? As far as I've seen, the conversion rate is much lower than that, especially if you don't price at 99c. The thing with web fiction is that most readers are used to reading stories for free. There's not much reason for most of them to pay, especially not if they've already read the story for free.

    Of course you might get a big enough spike on day 1 to draw interest from Amazon customers who don't know about your web fiction, but that's very much up to chance to coincidence and doesn't happen too often.

    IMHO you'd be much better off investing that advertising money directly in the ebooks - for edits, for a professional looking cover, and some early advertising to bolster your Amazon rank and visibility.

    Anathema, a web serial about the effect superpowers would have on our world. http://anathemaserial.wordpress.com/
  7. Blaise Corvin (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    @Chrysalis - I created a very illuminating survey. Lots of data. http://blaise-corvin.com/2016/01/20/delvers-llc-survey/

    Visit my site, http://www.blaise-corvin.com. I have punch and pie.
    I also have two stories: Delvers LLC and The Crimson Artifice. :)
  8. Billy Higgins Peery (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    Hey Blaise, love that you collected that data -- I've been wondering about such things myself. I am curious though, how many people responded to the survey? And what does that number look like when compared to your total readership?

    I ask because I wonder about self-selecting bias. Those who answer the survey are also more likely to buy the book, because they're more engaged readers.

    Whatever the answer, I appreciate that you went out of your way to collect the data. It's useful to you, but also the community as a whole.

    @Sten: Thanks for pointing that out, it is a big concern! I'm working on a VR serial though, so I think I'm in RRL'S wheelhouse ;)

    "Any number of hitlers, are still not my problem." -Tempest
  9. Chrysalis (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    What Billy said!

    Hey, I'll read your VR stuff. Make an ebook! :D

    Anathema, a web serial about the effect superpowers would have on our world. http://anathemaserial.wordpress.com/
  10. Billy Higgins Peery (Member)

    Posted 3 years ago

    Thanks Chrysalis! That's definitely the plan, and the info you and Blaise have been providing has definitely helped me set expectations for what it might look like when I start releasing ebooks.

    (There's just so much to know. This writing thing is HARD!)

    "Any number of hitlers, are still not my problem." -Tempest
  11. unice5656 (Moderator)

    Posted 3 years ago

    @Billy

    I managed to build quite a large readership on RRL on very irregular updates, on average probably once a month. However, I did this back when RRL was new to webfiction publishing and there was very little competition to get on the Best Rated list.

    I think it really depends on what you define as "real success". The two smaller projects I've posted on RRL have ~200 and ~80 followers, which I am very happy with, because the reviews have been very positive.

    You don't need to publish a new chapter every day to build a readership, but it helps you do it faster. It's really just the number of times you get on the Latest Updates list, so if you update once a week, assume it will take around 7x the amount of time to get the same number of readers as if you updated every day. What I did for each of my fictions was save up 5-7 chapters and release them every day until I ran out; this is more just for self-encouragement as you quickly build up the seed of your reader base and get enough feedback to make it feel like someone actually read your stuff.

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