Share a Bit About Yourselves

Responses

  1. alex5927 (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    @mathtans nope, sorry. It was almost six years ago, and when my school got hold of it, there were...problems

  2. Jim Zoetewey (Moderator)

    Posted 4 years ago

    You know, we probably ought to do a thread like this every year or so and see what's the same and what's changed.

    1. Jim Zoetewey. Why? Because it's my name. If I made something up, it would be more interesting. My serial is the Legion of Nothing.

    2. I've been writing it since 2007.

    3. It's hard to answer how long I've been writing. It's actually a little like asking how long I've been playing bass guitar. I've OWNED a bass guitar for twenty years. Only two or three years count in terms of regular practice and performance though. Similarly, I've written inconsistently since at least high school, very consistently during late college/early grad school, and restarted again in 2007.

    4. My earliest story? I'm pretty sure it was about a talking car that magically came together in a junk yard. Look, I was 8. Don't judge me.

    5. I ran across a serial called Tales of MU which was being advertised on a web comic called Evil Inc. I clicked through, found that it didn't suck, and secondly *had readers*. After a few months of reading it, I started my own serial.

    6. I was part of a group of web serial authors who Chris recruited to be part of a web directory that would be run better than Pages Unbound (started by the author of Tales of MU). You could say I discovered it when Chris sent the group a link for the demo site and eventually the real one. You could also say the group all discovered it in the process of talking about what a site like this should include.

    7. Grand Lake, Michigan is a combination of Grand Rapids, Michigan (where I live) and Holland, Michigan (where I grew up). I try to reflect the place where it fits the story. That results in occasionally writing about more personal things than you'd think in a serial that at least theoretically involves a lot of superpowered people punching each other. No people are based on people I know, but I have included characters that make me feel the same way as people I know--who share no traits or details in common.

    8. It's hard to say what I'm proudest of. Mostly I'm grateful people are reading my story at all. I'm told that the pacing is good. I'm told I do cliffhangers well. I'm told I write fights well. I'm in the midst of editing chunks of story into novels right now, so I don't feel like I'm doing anything particularly brilliantly. There are a lot of things I want to fix.

    9. What do I feel I'm doing wrong? In a general sense, I could include more description. Plus seven years in, there are a lot of details and characters to keep track of. I fear messing those details up.

    10. Success? For me that means selling more ebooks/print/audiobooks on Amazon, and more readers for my web serial--ideally to the point that it generates a liveable income. After that, in a completely ideal world, I'd love to see Legion of Nothing on tv or as a movie. It would also be amazing to be asked to write a comic by a major comic book company.

    Billy: I'm straight, and I find being obsessed with sports a bit of a mystery too. To the larger issue of diversity that Mathtans raised, well... I try to have a diverse group of characters. I don't know if I succeed completely, but I feel like I'm close enough. I try to write individual characters that work even if they're not an average example of any particular group.

  3. Tartra (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    @Jim - I'd like that idea. Like mathtans said, one of the risks of being a tighter knit community is cliques. Considering how easy it was for someone like me and bunch of others to slide in, it's not a problem right now. Getting to do this as a snapshot of WFG, though, would give a lot of future newbies an even playing ground to come in on.

    It'd also be awesome to see how everyone's progressed and watch how close we get to that ultimate success - or whether that idea of success changes.

    @Billy - Sports obsessions are actually rooted in reasonable things! I know you're probably kidding with that example, but if you were ever interested, I could help you out with some research explaining it. For the record, I know a couple of gay guys who're diehard hockey everything, so it's not just for straight guys. :D

    The Other Kind of Roommate — Like Fight Club meets X-Men meets The Matrix meets Superbad.
  4. Oniwasabi (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.

    Chad Haakenson/Oniwasabi. I've been Oniwasabi on the internet for a little over two decades, but my work is all publishing with my real name attached! My current serials are The Monster They Deserve (original); Yes, Your Highness (original); and Second String Supers (fan-based).

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?

    I started writing my original serials in earnest around September 2014. My site went live with them available to read on January 1st, 2015.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?

    I've been writing stuff since I was about 10 or 11, tried to seriously write something for the first time out of a High School Creative Writing class project (it failed because I couldn't figure out how the middle part went, I really liked my beginning and ending!) and then started writing again around September 2013 when I posted my first online fiction (which was a fan-based spinoff set in Drew Hayes' Super Powereds world)

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)?

    The earliest work I can remember was extremely terrible. None of it exists anymore. I don't think any of it had a name, but it was some really bad attempts to write high-fantasy fiction stuff.

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?

    At first because I was posting a fan fiction work based on a serial, on that serial's web site so it made a lot of sense. Later, because I realized that HAVING to post a chapter on a regular schedule keeps me from pulling things back to the editing table to try and tweak them for eternity. Once it's posted somewhere my brain switches over to "Done." I can still make corrections, and even fairly major edits when needed, but until I get that little flag to trigger I will constantly try to re-write things.

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?

    From the bottom of Top Web Fiction, which I found from various vote buttons on a few different serials

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?

    Basically none. I'm actually working really hard to make sure that I'm not basing any characters in my current works off of people that I know, and the settings are far enough outside of reality that the rest is mostly making sure that it's all internally consistent instead of based on actual events.

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?

    The fact that I finally made myself do it. I've wanted to do something like this for years, and it took a serial I was reading opening up the setting for fan-made works that finally got me to post something out there. That first step was way harder than it should have been, and the rest of it has been easy in comparison.

    9) What are you the most unsure about?

    Mostly I'm just nervous that I'm not going to be able to keep up with the serials and have to disappoint a bunch of people. Aside from that, I'd like to save all of my major uncertainties until I manage to finish at least one book's worth of material (that isn't fanfic) ^_^

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?

    Realistically it means I have several successful ebooks for sale and I can switch my schedule to full time writing and part time at my day job. Hurray!

    cmh-fiction.com
    A place for me to inflict my writings upon an unprepared and unsuspecting world!
  5. Psycho Gecko (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.
    Psycho Gecko, World Domination in Retrospect

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?
    A little more than two years now.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?
    Hard to say. Prior to the serial, I did some minor short works, but mostly funny commentary. Though, before that, there was a college short fiction writing course...

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)?
    When I was a kid, I believe I tried to right a very short horror story loaded with monsters, including two-headed bats. You know, I bet I could make a two-headed bat work nowadays.

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?
    All the cool kids were doing it. That, and it had the potential for me to be a South Park-esque long runner without end.

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?
    It all began the day I wandered through Chinatown, looking for something new in my life. I'd been told about a seedy merchant with unique merchandise. I expected a cart, a store, anything but a musty little shop crammed between Egg Foo Duck's Noodletorium and the Happy Beginning's Massage Parlor. The creepy old man inside insisted that he had what I needed: a puzzle box that could show me pleasure beyond imagination. I said "Screw that, let me just use your bathroom." Inside the tiny watercloset that I later found out was a poorly-labeled women's room, I saw "For a good time, call Webfictionguide." When the screaming began outside the door, I crawled to safety through an air conditioning duct.

    That, or I saw it on either Legion of Nothing or Worm.

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?
    A modified form of my home town and college town, an unnamed copy of myself, and even my own name have been used in-story.

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?
    When I hear that people still want to hear what I have to say about Wildbow's stories. That, and when someone informs me they spit their drink up.

    9) What are you the most unsure about?
    You know what? Just imagine Ted Buckland from Scrubs for this answer.

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?
    Oh god, why did you ask number 9? If anyone needs me, I'll be curled up somewhere. Maybe check under your cars before backing up. Or not.

  6. Shannon (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    1) I’m Shannon Haddock, and my serial is Intertwined Lives.

    2) Bits of it are rewrites of my 2012 Nanowrimo project, but in its present form I’ve only been working on it since last fall.

    3) I don’t remember writing anything but a silly song to help my sister overcome her fear of thunderstorms until I was eight, but my mother claims I was telling my own versions of things like The Three Little Pigs before I could write.

    4) The earliest story I remember writing was for a third grade assignment. We had to take something that had really happened, start with it, then have it change into a make believe story. I wrote about going trick-or-treating and . . . I can’t recall what happened. I think we got kidnapped by aliens or a witch or maybe both. I do recall that I was disappointed in it because what was in my head was nowhere near as cool as what I managed to get on paper. I still have that problem a lot.

    5) Because I realized my story would work great as a webcomic and can’t draw and my previous attempts at getting friends to work on a comic with me have all fizzled out quickly. So I thought, “What the hell, I can do it without pretty pictures!”

    6) I was googling for something serial writing related and it was the first match that looked helpful.

    7) Consciously, only the general appearance of the area most of the characters live in is drawn from my life, namely the area most of my family lives in in Tennessee. Subconsciously, I found echoes from real life in the most unexpected places when I reread what I’ve written.

    8) I think I’ve got a really unique concept, since the story is in a space opera setting, but the plots are much more day in the life. So far it doesn’t seem to be appealing to other people much, but I’m having fun writing it.

    9) I worry that my concept is too unique and I’ll never have readers. Also some of the one and two star reviews of my novellas have made me wonder if maybe I am delusional to think I’m a remotely good writer.

    10) All the success I’ve dreamed of?! I live in a Queen Anne style mansion on my own private island, have won the Hugo and Nebula, and JMS and Joss Whedon are working together on a movie based on my works. More realistically though, I’d be quite happy just making enough from writing to live on.

    http://intertwined-lives.universal-nexus.com A story about what goes on in a space opera setting when people aren't saving the day.
  7. MaddiroseX (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    This has been a super interesting thread to follow, seeing everyones' answers to these questions! I feel like I'm finding out so much about fellow serialists :)

    --------------

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.
    I'm Maddison Rose X, aka Maddirose. I write Twisted Cogs, and wrote the completed serial Orbital Academy.

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?
    Twisted Cogs is 281 days old (9 months), OA ran for 7 months.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?
    I am the odd duck out in this group, it seems! I didn't realize that so many serialists have been writing since their teen years and earlier; the first thing I wrote was in August of 2013, so I'm apparently one of the baby writers here.

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)?
    Heh, since it wasn't so long ago, I actually still have it in my google drive. Promise not to judge TOO hard please, I have improved since then: I Was All a Dream
    How terrible was it? Well as you can see, very much so. It's quite far up its own ass in terms of pretentiousness and aren't-I-deepitude, but it also suffers from all of the bad writing habits I've painstakingly overcome over the past 2 years (and a few bad writing habits I've not-quite-yet overcome as well).
    As far as what I learned from it, I suppose the biggest thing I learned was that I was allowed to write things, no one was going to smack me for it. A strange lesson, but up until that point I hadn't really allowed myself to create things that I let other people see, so it was kind of an important one.

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?
    hehehe here's another answer that I think is unique. I actually didn't start out by writing a serial, I started out by writing a one-off erotica porn story about people banging in space. It was a lot of fun to write, and the overwhelming majority of the feedback I got on it was that I should write a sequel. So I wrote a sequel, then a sequel to that one. I kept to a schedule to keep myself writing, and I started having so many ideas about the characters and worldbuilding that I had to cut down on the sex. Finally I suddenly realized that I had accidentally started writing a web serial (albeit a pornographic one), so I put up a website, jumped onto WFG, and ran with it :D

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?
    I think I found it via Ouri Maler's "Saga of Soul", but I actually don't remember.

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?
    As far as I know, 0% of my stuff draws from people or places I know IRL. Of course there are some overlap in the character archetypes that I use and people I know, but I really do like coming up with things wholesale.

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?
    I'm very proud of my 'firsts'. First 1k views, first email from a fan, first donation, first angry comment, first book sale. All very external-type things to be proud of, I know, but I am what I am.

    9) What are you the most unsure about?
    Absolutely everything. Not just "is this chapter good" or "is this character coming across right", I mean literally everything. Chapter length, schedule, site layout, what keyboard to get, what tea to drink while writing, font choice. A few times I've had people compliment me on something done really well, and I grin because the reason it's done well is because of the hours I've spent obsessing about whether or not I've done it as well as I could. The trick is to make sure everything is done first, then obsess about doing things better (that way even if I run out of time because of obsessing, I still don't fall too far behind)

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?
    It means I walk into my boss' office, shake his hand, tell him I loved programming for him but that I'm going to be an author now, walk out and never look back.

    Spurs & Seraphim (ongoing) | Beta Key (complete) | Twisted Cogs (complete) | Orbital Academy (complete)
  8. Khronosabre (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    This is fascinating. I love things like this and finding out little commonalities between us. @Tartra, someone else who started their serial as a one-on-one RP! I thought we were the only ones which was confusing and surprising to me haha. Glad we're not alone. And @Kess writing on dot matrix paper was the shit hahah Spread that bad boy out across the floor and just write and draw forever.

    Anyway! This is cool.

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.
    I've been going by Khronos since 2000, but my real name's Hayley. Hi. I co-write Caelum Lex.

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?
    We've been publishing since August 2013 I think, but as I said above, it was an RP before that I think started in late 2011. And I actually invented two of the main characters when I was 15 so...a decade ago. Geez.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?
    My mother taught me to write when I was very young. Or perhaps she only taught me to read and I figured out the writing bit on my own. I didn't learn about spaces until I started school though...

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)?
    I have it somewhere. It's in a pound store notebook and it's written in pink marker and it's about a puppy and a pony that are best friends and there are no spaces between the words. I was probably 4.

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?
    Natural extension of the RP format. And I like the episodic nature of it. It gives room to experiment and play with different scenarios and situations while still advancing towards a larger plot. I guess I'd say it's less commitment than a more traditional novel format. I don't like commitment.

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?
    Googling

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?
    I'd say all my characters have some part of me in them. Different parts though. Fiearius is my anger and confidence and questioning. Cyrus is my logic and sarcasm. Corra is my optimism. A lot of the planets we write are reminiscent of our favorite places too. Satieri comes from my love of the desert. A little bit of Vegas. Paradiex was Miami. Vescent I'm pretty sure is Chicago though you'd have to ask Jenn on that one :P

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?
    What I hope is my witty dialogue?

    9) What are you the most unsure about?
    My ability to toe the line between comedy and drama.

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?
    It means I magically developed better art skills so I can quit my job and devote my time to making a full comic out of the damn thing. And fanart. And fanfiction. Fans. In general. Con appearances. The dream, man. The dream.

  9. DrewHayes (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    Well this is neat! Reading through everyone's post gave me a pleasant break from fighting plot.

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.

    Drew Hayes/Drew Hayes. I really wish I'd used a penname when I started all this, but the boat has definitely sailed on that one. Oh, and my serial is Super Powereds, though I did one before that called No More Ramen. Oh and I write a Super Powereds spin-off called Corpies!

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?

    I want to say around 5 years. I know I was writing it by mid-2010, but I don't know the exact time it started.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?

    Um, I guess for funsies as a kid I did a little in high school, but I didn't start taking serious cracks at it until I was around 22.

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)?

    Aside from school assignments and stuff with me dicking around, I took a swing at a novel at the aforementioned age of 22. It was BAD. Jesus, it was so terrible. Supernatural action mash-up with Mary Sues left and right. Bluh. I still keep it on my computer and look through it anytime I feel like I might be getting too sure of myself. I did learn a lot from it though, most importantly that writing your own style is more important that what you think you think you should write.

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?

    At the time, I was stuck in an office job with lots of free time, and stumbled across Digital Novelists and their authors. After seeing the cool works people were putting up, I decided to take my own crack at it.

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?

    Damn... it's been a while. Probably from one of the other DN sites I frequented when I was first starting.

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?

    In terms of the college environment, probably a fair bit, though I had to tone down the partying and stupidity (despite what some people think) way down from the real deal. Superheroes are supposed to be better than us, after all. As far as characters, there are probably a few smatterings here and there, but probably no one that matches up blow for blow with a person in my life, self included.

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?

    I really like my characters. I feel like they help carry me past the parts I'm weaker on, because I do a fairly good job of making them feel real, even in the most unnreal of circumstances around them.

    9) What are you the most unsure about?

    Pretty much an inverse of what Billy mentioned way back. Writing diverse characters always worries me, because I like making my characters pretty fucked up and prone to mistakes. When I have a character with a certain orientation, gender, or race, I frequently worry that I'll write something meant to be a failing and learning moment, but will actually tie in to some stereotype people have about that group. I'm slowly growing more comfortable with it, and the diversity in my books shows it, but it's still one of the things I'm most unsure and cautious about.

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?

    Worldwide fame and success, followed by the gods descending from Olympus to raise me up as one of their own. Or, you know, a movie deal would probably be pretty fun. Heck, I'm still just happy every time someone write in to tell me they like the books.

    Super Powereds & Corpies
    http://www.DrewHayesNovels.com/
  10. Chrysalis (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.

    I try to keep my real name off the internet, but my serial handle is Chrysalis, and my pen name will soon be O.C. Rising. I write the web serial Anathema and am currently working on the ebooks.

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?

    Nearly a year, if we count the first test drafts that were edited a bunch of times before the start of the serial. Those test drafts happened in April / May 2014, and the serial went live on June 22nd.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?

    I started when I was 8, then stopped in my late teens for some reason. Didn't do any writing for more than a decade, only a few short (2K words or so) pieces of videogame roleplay stuff. Like this: http://oldforums.eveonline.com/?a=topic&threadID=769313

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)?

    One-page stories about my grandparents' dog at age 8. They were absolutely awful. I didn't even like the dog (he was a sausage with legs that kept trying to hump people's legs) but the stories made my grandparents happy.

    Lessons learned: write about things you like!

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?

    It struck me like lightning sometime after reading Worm.

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?

    As others have said - Wildbow

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?

    I don't know. Everything and nothing. I can't think of a single character or place that remotely resembles anyone or anything from real life, but of course all of them have been created in the spirit of my accumulated life experience.

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?

    My native language is German. I never attended language courses or spent any amount of time in English speaking countries, yet I managed to improve my writing to the point where my readers don't notice the difference. The same is true for overall writing style - my first drafts back in April 2014 were clunky, pretentious garbage that was alternately strangely structured / grammatically incorrent or pure purple prose. Now I work with an editor, and a beta reader told me the final version reads like something that was trad published by one of the big 5. I don't know how true that is, but I feel good about it.

    Wow. Holy cow. I still don't believe I'm doing this.

    9) What are you the most unsure about?

    The English. All the time. You've no idea how often I have to google phrase search just to be halfway sure of correct structure and wording. Get off the train or get out of the train? Google is my friend.

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?

    As others have mentioned, enough money / fame to live the dream. I don't think it will happen with the serial, though. I believe the books will be more successful - the serial never was professionally edited, and never will be beyond the first 3 arcs.

    Anathema, a web serial about the effect superpowers would have on our world. http://anathemaserial.wordpress.com/
  11. Wildbow (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.

    Wildbow, J.C. McCrae in real life (going by this as an author because my real name is shared by a fairly known poet).

    I wrote Worm and Pact, and I'm now writing Twig.

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?

    Twig started on the 8th of March, as of the time I write this, only five chapters are live.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?

    I've always been creative. If you want to ask how long I've been storytelling, probably since I was eight or so. I'd hang out with my brother and play 'imagination' and tell a story with him chiming in with a character's actions. I moved on to take a lot of art classes, but was never particularly strong.

    Around grade seven or so, I had to do a project for a 'world issues' class, writing a myth, and the (very eccentric) teacher liked my 'legend of the hedgehog's prickles' enough that she had me read it in front of the class. That sort of gave me permission to write.

    I had a hard time in school back then, being disabled, nerdy, and a bit of an airhead besides. I started writing to vent, and my very first story was lengthy, at about 50,000 words, almost a complete book. More on this in reply to the next question. I've been writing since, but ran into a bit of an issue. Over the years, as my critical ability outpaced my writing, I began to write less and less, until I stalled in my mid-late teens. Couldn't get past a few pages. I only broke that pattern with Worm.

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)?

    My earliest work could be described as Buffy without the Slayer. I called it 'City of Woe', wherein a demon possessed girl tries to hide her afflication, a girl becomes a vampire, and a boy and a girl become ghouls, with a compulsion to eat human flesh as they gradually became more monstrous.

    Honestly, the best lesson I learned was one I promptly forgot. The key to writing, especially early on, is to keep going. You finish, then you revise. The trap I fell into with my writing for ten or twelve years was that I was caught up in getting it right the first time. The reason my first story got as long as it did was that I didn't fuss about that. I chased that ability to write freely for so long and only found it again later.

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?

    I meandered through University, and found the stuff I was interested in with a class on Applied Language. How we learn or teach language, how we use it, how we adjust it for different settings and topics, etc, etc. Who what where when and why of language learning, in a nutshell.

    A piece by Peter Elbow nailed down that 'finish, then revise' idea for me, and some of the coursework I undertook fixated on the various approaches to studying writing. So often, we focus on the product. People who teach by the product approach ask you to write and hand in an assignment and then grade it on how good it is. Expanding outward, a better approach is the Process approach. The writing process, the behavior of the writer at the keyboard, and how they find and organize their ideas. This is where Elbow's stuff came in.

    There's also the Social-environmental approach, where you take another step back and look at lifestyle, culture, and all the peripheral stuff that feeds into one's ability to write or write well (or inability/writing poorly). It was only with the writing of Pact that I really faced the demons of the social-environmental approach.

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?

    Google.

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?

    Worm was based loosely on a mashup of Vancouver and Maine, both places I've visited in the short term. The main cast of characters were aspects of myself, taken away and portioned out. It helped that I also based them on Erikson's stages of life, so I could draw from those lessons myself. Trust vs. mistrust, etc.

    Pact's location was based more on my own experiences with small towns - around the time I was writing Pact, I was looking into moving out of Ottawa and to a town between Ottawa and Toronto. Lower rent, for a full-time writer. The protagonist's family in Pact doesn't resemble my own much at all.

    Saying more about Twig would be spoiling for the readers that are on this board, I think.

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?

    Finishing. It's something I struggled with for a really long time, and even if my endings may be wobbly or something I'm still working on, I think it's super important to be consistent, keep a schedule and to finish our work, doing web serials. I know real life intervenes, and I know it's hard to keep going when you're not doing well, but as Worm took off I got to glimpse a lot of recommendations popping up here and there, and when people already knew about web serials, there was a pretty negative bias because 'serials don't usually finish'. People don't want to invest in something that might just stop all of a sudden.

    Reaching the end point is critical, but I can't really do anything for or with other authors to really help them to that finish line. I can only do my part and hope we see a shift in the trend.

    9) What are you the most unsure about?

    The future is a shaky thing. I had a peak of about 55,000 views and 22,000 readers for Worm in November 2013 as the story ended. Worm appealed to a great many readers in a great many ways, and it lent itself to troping and debate.

    Moving to Pact, I only had about 10,000 views and 3,000 readers, and from the story's start to the story's end, that number stayed fairly consistent. I think I had 4,000 readers at the end.

    Starting Twig, I have 6,000 views and 2500 readers average (after the peak of initial interest on chapter one).

    It's a downward trend.

    Financially I'm doing ok. I'm pulling in about $2500 a month, give or take, and funds are up with Twig starting, but a downward trend is a downward trend, and while I'm okay and I have enough savings to coast on for a year or two, and I know I'll make some money with the release of Worm, but I wonder where things will stand in five or ten years.

    When some of the numbers look less stellar over time and I'm doing this as a living, it's a little concerning.

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?

    My other serials are doing even better, and Worm has sold enough that I not only don't have to worry about the future, but am able to hire employees to handle merchandising and some other peripheral stuff. Contacts I've made have opened doors and the market has changed enough over the years that we can easily put books together as a pseudo-publishing house.

    In a crazy, crazy world, Worm is on TV as an HBO series, and is out there as a video game. Pact is a fan-made (with official okay/peerage) adventure game, and my other serials are similarly featured in other media.

    My dream, ultimately, in continuing to reach the finish line, is to have a bookshelf filled with my work, all the titles as four-letter words.

  12. Feidor S. LaView (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.
    Feidor S. LaView (my actual name, letters shuffled) Seagrave's Journey

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?
    I started writing on October 2013 but had to quit on Jan'14 due to lack of time. Then I started writing again in Oct'14.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?
    I've written some stuff before, articles and the like, but my first fiction was Seagrave's first installment.

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)
    Seagrave's Joruney, I must admit. Though I've got the feeling that I'm learning every day I write, it is still too early to say what have I learned.

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?
    At first I intended to write flash fiction. When submiting 'No Hope, No Fear' to the fridayflash.org I saw a checkbox asking whether a submission was part of a serial or not. I clicked yes.

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?
    After clicking 'yes' I started to look for sites like the fridayflash.org. I found the Tuesdayserial.org, then 'Worm', and then WFG.

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?
    I know it may be hard to believe but the answer is that most of Seagrave draws upon people I know and places I lived/visited. However, to get the feel of places I have not visited, like Macau or Ithaca (NY), I use street view and pictures/videos uploaded by other people. Also, pictures I come across —like that of the chinese novel written on the walls of an abandoned house— can be a good source of inspiration.

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?
    I believe I can tell a good story and I think I'll be able to do it even better. More than a writer I expect to become a good storyteller.

    9) What are you the most unsure about?
    My English. Not my first language and this is sort of a handicap. First thing I'm doing after finishing Seagrave's 3rd season is get myself an editor and see what happens :)

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?
    There is a lot of hard work ahead, more that I ever thought before typing my first words, but now I know I can do it.

  13. t4nky (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    1) Name and stuff

    Adam "t4nky" Sherman

    2) How long have you been writing your current web serial?

    I think I started Nowhere Island University in mid-February, but I may have actually started in January.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?

    My first story to be in some form other than loose-leaf paper or sitting on some hard drive where no one can see it is something about a headless horse cat. I don't really remember anything except it was a picture book that got put into an actual hardcover format. It was in first grade. I've been doing stuff like that ever since, though it has improved. (Now I wanna find it. That would be awesome.)

    4) What's the earliest work you can remember?

    See above. Kind of rushed into that. Whoops.

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?

    I actually started doing it before I even knew web serials existed. I had this Blogger site (see if you can spot what I did wrong with it: http://t4nky.blogspot.com/) when I was a senior in high school. I would post a story on it once a week every week. It was a complete and utter mess, not because of the stories but because of the horridness of my layout. Instead of doing the normal, smart thing, I had a link to a google doc. I also had no way of archiving anything. The reason I went to the web was because I thought I'd be able to get the occasional comment from random people. Due to this lack of marketing and understanding of how to organize a site for a web serial, everything fell apart.

    I came back to serials because I saw Worm. One of the reasons was because I had matured a lot as a person. The main reason was because suddenly, everything just clicked.

    6) How did you find WebFiction Guide?

    I'm not sure. I think that was another thing Worm taught me. Or maybe I found it out when researching how to market NIU.

    7) What am I proudest of in my writing?

    I think I have a great sense of atmosphere. There was this one story I wrote called "Little Things" (this was before my blog) where I had made this horror story about these terrorists who invade a research hospital to find information on these amoral experiments and end up unleashing this *thing* that starts killing people off one by one. I think I had this really good sense of claustrophobia and dread. I also fixed the "why don't you call the cops?" problem by having the cops be just waiting outside, preparing to send in a SWAT team, with the only question being if they'd send it in before or after the monster had killed all the main characters.

    I also think my fight scenes are pretty good. The only problem with them is that I'll never be able to put one of my fight scenes in a kid's book. They tend to get... intense. If you read NIU's next update, you'll know what I'm talking about.

    9)What are you most unsure about?

    Honestly? Everything. My audience almost never comments on my stuff. I once had a complete troll comment on my previous site, but no one else ever commented again.

    If I had to choose one area, it would be marketing. The number of zero-view days I have is proof.

    Also, I want to work on my humor. More funny, less disembowling.

    10) Congratulations! You win!

    Sorry for not having the entire question. Ice cream thawing. And me bored.

    Anyway, I have four goals. 1) Get at least two people commenting a week on NIU, maybe even a TV Tropes page. That would be lovely. 2) Make enough money to quit my job. My boss is nice, and the pay is $4 above MA minimum wage. However, it is not what I want to do with my life, and I do NOT want to go back to college. 3) FINISH IT! Seriously, not finishing things is one of my problems writing. Then I can work on something where people don't get eviscerated or crucified to the ceiling. You know, something normal. 4) Enough money to start my own animation-and-videogame company.

    "An uneducated man may rob a rail car. An educated man can steal the railway."
    https://nowhereislanduniversity.wordpress.com/
  14. Chrysalis (Member)

    Posted 4 years ago

    Try not to get so hung up on comments. Even with 400 views a day, I still only have one comment some weeks. I don't know how others do it, or why my readers are so passive. Sometimes I get more comments on the serial in email and forum posts / PMs (Myth Weavers) than on Wordpress.

    It's especially disheartening because I see some of my readers comment all over the place on other serials, just not mine. 300+ people check out the new chapter every week, but only 1-2 comment.

    Anathema, a web serial about the effect superpowers would have on our world. http://anathemaserial.wordpress.com/
  15. Chris Poirier (Moderator)

    Posted 4 years ago

    I don't really fit into the group any more, as I'm not currently writing, but I'll post anyway. Because it's my site, and I'll crash the party if I want to. :)

    1) Your name/penname/handle and title of your serial.

    Chris Poirier. I once wrote a serial called Winter Rain. In the end, I wrote myself into a corner I couldn't find a way out of, so it ended with being finished.

    2) How long have you been writing this serial?

    I wrote 77 installments during 2008 and 2009.

    3) How long have you been writing at all?

    Started writing in elementary school. Got much praise from my teachers. I've since read those stories. The praise was all lies. LIES!

    Went back at it in 2004. Haven't written much since Winter Rain ended. I'd like to change that soon.

    4) What's your earliest work you can remember (bonus: how terrible was it, can you share it with us and what were the best lessons you learned)?

    See previous comment about LIES!

    There are things I'm willing to share with you. Those "stories" are not among them. :P

    5) Why did you pick serial writing?

    Wanted to get myself to stop editing everything to death. Wanted to get past a first chapter. Writing and posting it immediately was meant to address both things. Worked for a while. Eventually, though, I wanted the writing to get better, and that meant letting the editor back into the process, a bit.

    In the end, had I let the editor in earlier, I might not have written myself into such a corner. Hard to say.

    6) How did you find WebFictionGuide?

    It was easy to find, once I'd registered the domain name. ;)

    7) How much of your story draws upon people in your life, places you live or places you've visited?

    I write first-person. All of my first-person narrators are made of pieces of me. They aren't me, by any means, but I don't know how to write a first-person narrator from a perspective I don't actually understand. I draw bits from who I am and who I was, re-arrange them, run them through the character's backstory, and see what comes out.

    As for settings and story lines, well, I tend to write fantasy, so most of those things are far more imagined than real. But, sure, sometimes a scene will draw more directly on something I remember.

    8) What are you proudest about in your writing?

    There's some writing in Winter Rain I'm really happy with. It's tight and effective and, in a few cases, even a bit beautiful. Certainly not all—or even most—of Winter Rain falls into that category. But, yeah, of the 77 installments I wrote, there are a handful I think are probably as good as I'm ever going to write. I read those few bits, and they make me want to write again.

    Tied with that, though, is a short I wrote in 2004, called Dajoën. There are so many things wrong with it—it lacks tension, it lacks plot, it lacks...most of what makes a story a story.... But, despite numerous attempts, I was never able to improve on it. It's probably the most honest thing I've ever written, and when I read it out loud...yeah, I'm proud of it. Even now, 11 years later, I still love every word.

    9) What are you the most unsure about?

    Almost every word I write.

    Sadly, not a joke. :|

    10) Congratulations! Your serial has just achieved all the success you dreamed about! What does that mean for you?

    Winter Rain was an experiment for me, to try two things I was bad at: writing without editing; and writing something tense. I just wanted to tell a good story. To find out if I could. I never really had grand plans for it. Truth be told, writing is hard work, and I'm way better at programming. Programming usually pays better, too. :)

    Robin McKinley wrote two of my all time favourite books: The Blue Sword and The Hero and the Crown. I've probably read them both dozens of times. For me, they are a warm, fuzzy blanket on a cold night. They are friends I long to know for real. For me, success in writing would be giving that to someone else.

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