Page: 123

Responses

  1. Blaise Corvin (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    No introduction? No bit about what this is for? Nothing?

    K. Sounds legit.

    Visit my site, http://www.blaise-corvin.com. I have punch and pie.
    I also have two stories: Delvers LLC and The Crimson Artifice. :)
  2. SovereignofAshes (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    Someone still has their Viagra-hat on. Still busy running and dodging all those undead Nigerian princes?

    Maybe shy Davidha is shy.

    Benefit of the doubt that this isn't a bot or whatever... It is a good idea for a lurker of a writing community. You get the advice you need to start a web serial or other project and you don't have to spend a lot of time on people's biases, quips, snarks, or gigantic walls of text. We all know how some people have allergic reactions to those (even though they're writers/readers). :P

    If a real person, power to them. If they're a bot... Well, maybe Google finally programmed all of our replacements. They want us to feed the A.I.s so we become (more) redundant! Davidha is an agent for SkyNet! Soon we'll see skeletal George R. R. Martin killbots waddling their way down the streets shooting M.D.C. lasers from antique quills while yelling "Shame... Shame... Shame!"

    I have stuff on here too! The Vorrgistadt Saga.
  3. LadyAnder (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    Perhaps you should consider a few thing before doing something like this.

    Before engaging in a writing forum, I suggest lurk. I like lurking. I always lurk before joining something.

    Introduce yourself would've been wise. You'll be less likely to get snarky remarks and actually assistance. You might have engaging conversation with someone and learn how to communicate.

    And if you thought this was easier by survey, tell us what the survey is and why are you planning to do with the information provided. That's a bit of courtesy so we know you are an actually person and not a bot.

    A slice-of-life fantasy novel--> https://hyruhhaserial.wordpress.com/
  4. Tartra (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    I kind of think we need a Welcome Wagon or something. We don't need mandatory introduction threads, but for new folks who show up and dive into the forums, maybe we could have a little, "Hi, how are you, why don't you tell us a little about yourself before we get back into discussing what you've brought to share?" prompt.

    Only because - and I say this with a lot of love - as much as I adore our snark when it's clearly a spambot, when it's on the edge for whether this could be a real person, I think we should err harder on the side of, "Oh, this person forgot to introduce themselves. Let's say hi like it was an honest mistake."

    Game's on whenever it's a spambot, though. No holdsies-backsies.

    The Other Kind of Roommate — Like Fight Club meets X-Men meets The Matrix meets Superbad.
  5. Alexander.Hollins (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    A couple of facebook groups im in have been getting a lot of this exact same bs. It's people collecting info to use for making articles and books about "how to write" and try and get pages up there in seo ranks. ugh.

  6. Tartra (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    @Alexander - Then initiate Operation: No Holdsies-Backsies.

    The Other Kind of Roommate — Like Fight Club meets X-Men meets The Matrix meets Superbad.
  7. Alexander.Hollins (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    1. How would you start a novel?

    With the table of contents. Its dry, but goes down quick, gets the saliva flowing.

    2. What methods are good for getting inspiration?

    running naked through a park with a swizzle stick up my ass, singing "singing in the rain."

    3. what sort of preparation should be made before writing a novel

    booze. lots and lots of booze. also, lube, if you like it that way.

    4. how should you develop narritve characters

    was that native or narrative? native characters are best developed by pushing them onto a reservation so you can develop their land. narrative characters are best developed in acid like photograph negatives.

    5. what elements does a good prologue need

    Wind, fire, all that kind of thing!

    6. in your opinion what perspective is easier to write from

    45 degree top down, like a JRPG

    7. how should a writer go about world building

    with VERY large tools and lotsa dirt.

    8. how much should a new writer write in a single sitting

    how much write could a new writer write if a new writer could write words?

    9. what age group would aim a fantasy novel at

    any, but remember, the younger the age group, the lower you need to aim to be sure not to have the book go winging over their heads.

    10. what type of publishing would you use for a new auther

    aether publishing is best done with crystal balls wrapped in platinum wire. Auture publishing, well, they can handle it their damn selves.

  8. Billy Higgins Peery (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    I was about to say we can't turn a simple link into a writing prompt. Sir Hollins, you've proven me wrong!

    Web Traffic Expert, my SEO business
    "Any number of hitlers, are still not my problem." -Tempest
  9. ubersoft (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    1. How would you start a novel?

    IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT, because it seemed to work for Snoopy.

    2. What methods are good for getting inspiration?

    I like to steal from Oscar Wilde. This occasionally requires time travel.

    3. What sort of preparation should be made before writing a novel?

    I make sure someone has the contact information for my next of kin. I always try to leave on good terms with my wife and daughter. Lately I've taken to leaving messages in a security box, to be published only on the event of my untimely death.

    4. How should develop narritive characters.

    By "narrit" I assume you are using the Finnish plural of "narri" which is the word for "fool," "joker," or "jester." How to develop a character who has the characteristics of a fool, joker, or jester is actually a pretty interesting question, since the archetype of the Fool is pretty complicated. The Fool is someone who usually immediately sees to the heart of the matter -- i.e., is aware of what is actually going on in the story, regardless of the multiple layers of perceptions in play -- but either a) doesn't explicitly explain, instead using humor as a cudgel to try to herd the other characters to the truth of it, or b) does come out and say it, but nobody pays any attention to him because he's "the Fool" (which makes him sort of like Cassandra, who was cursed to utter prophecies nobody believed.

    The Fool as a side character can be used as kind of a greek chorous, commenting on the story as it progresses. This can be useful in stories that use a tight, limited 3rd person perspective, since the Fool can give the reader insights to a specific characters inner workings without actually jumping into that character's head. In those situations I like to use the Fool as a mostly comic figure -- the smartass who always has a comment on hand, and I try to make sure that his or her best/funniest comments are also the ones with the most truth in terms of what's actually going on behind the scenes. Think of the Fool in King Lear for a basic model.

    When the Fool is a protagonist, things get a little harder. The Fool is usually someone who observes but doesn't get involved in events. The protagonist is usually thick in the middle of it all. Since it's more likely for the story to focus on the inner workings of the protagonist, making him or her the Fool can rob the Fool archetype a bit of its mystique -- they're almost always funnier and their words more cutting when you're not entirely sure how the Fool knows what he knows.

    A good trick to this is to make your Fool archetype protagonist an unreliable narrator -- if the audience is half-convinced the protagonist is lying to them, then you've got a little more to work with.

    5. What elements does a good prologue need

    A good prologue should always start a few thousand years before the actual story begins. It should feel rhythmically different from the rest of the book -- it's language should be elevated, and sound more like poetry. There should a reference to time being circular, a reference to people being pawns, trapped by destiny, and finally there should be a cryptic reference to a chosen one who will "cut that last, final cord."

    That's for westerns. When you move into mysteries, things get more complicated.

    6. In your opinion what perspective is easier to write from

    The answer to your question is "this is why so many writers are alcoholics."

    7. How should a writer go about world building

    Make sure you have all your permits in order, because the last thing you want is a writ from the city ordering you to tear it all down

    8. How much should a new writer write in a single sitting

    A new writer should aim for 10,000 words on the first day.

    Look, writing is brutal, but at the beginning of a project you're going to be amazingly enthusiastic about the whole thing. You need to leverage that enthusiasm for all its worth because two days after you start you'll be staring down the neck of a mostly empty bottle of bourbon dimly aware of how much you hate bourbon but really wishing you had more.

    9. what age group would aim a fantasy novel at

    I'm gonna disagree with Alexander here. Aim for the older crowd. The young ones are fast and good at dodging.

    10. What type of publishing would you use for a new auther

    Well Auther is a Gaelic name. In Celtic it means "bear" or "stone," and in Welsh it's something closer to "bear man." If you're publishing for bear men, especially for new ones, I would write it on thick bark and scatter it around their bear-man dens. I'd also hire someone else to actually drop it off, in case the bear men are peevish and want to hunt the world's most dangerous game.

    Hope these helped!

    Curveball (Updating)
    A Rake by Starlight (Updating)
  10. Blaise Corvin (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    1. How would you start a novel?

    Carefully.

    2. What methods are good for getting inspiration?

    Doing anything other than writing, preferably cat videos on youtube.

    3. What sort of preparation should be made before writing a novel?

    Dry socks.

    4. How should develop narritive characters.

    Pass. I won't publicly answer hot topic questions. Nice try, though.

    5. What elements does a good prologue need

    Ah - the element of surprise.

    6. In your opinion what perspective is easier to write from

    I suppose it depends on what you're trying to communicate. For instance, two doctors on call at a small clinic at all times would be a pair a docs.

    7. How should a writer go about world building

    Probably with paper mache. You don't want to create something too heavy for you to lift.

    8. How much should a new writer write in a single sitting

    Either one soliloquy or 3 Haiku

    9. what age group would aim a fantasy novel at

    Middle grade, and fill it with sex. Or adult, and fill it with middle grade flirting.

    10. What type of publishing would you use for a new auther

    Kobo and only Kobo

    Visit my site, http://www.blaise-corvin.com. I have punch and pie.
    I also have two stories: Delvers LLC and The Crimson Artifice. :)
  11. Alexander.Hollins (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    You two rock!

    Chris, your answer to 3 has Ten Duel Commandments from Hamilton in my head.

    Your answer to 4 is... really damn good advice, actually.

    i hope you two actually put these on the survey!

  12. justinwenger4 (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    1. How would you start a novel

    With a good hook. Literally. Start with a long and detailed description of nice hook, I recommend one used for fishing or pirate hands

    2. What methods are good for inspiration?

    Plagiarism

    3.What sort of preparation should be made before writing a novel?

    Sacrifice your firstborn son to the Elder God of Literature

    4. How should I develop narrative characters?

    Same way a boy develops into manhood. Make it slow, hairy, and with weird voice cracks at random points

    5. What elements does a good prologue need.

    Every noble gas on the periodic table

    6. In your opinion what perspective is easier to write from?

    The red one is the easiest to write from, although I know a lot of people who like blue perspectives

    7. How should a writer go about world building?

    There are a lot of great guides to world building, such as the Bible, The Art of the Deal, The Communist Manifesto, and Minecraft. Just use one of those.

    8. How much should a new writer write in a single sitting?

    Dont write at all, it's really hard. Just go play Xbox or something.

    9. What age group would you aim a fantasy novel at?

    Dead People, they've got plenty of time to read.

    10.What type of publishing should a new author use?
    Just print 10000 copies and throw it at people on the street

    Eidolonbound:http://royalroadl.com/fiction/11557
  13. TanaNari (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    1. How would you start a novel?

    By stealing some of the pot my neighbor thinks nobody knows is growing in his back yard.

    2. What methods are good for getting inspiration?

    Pants wetting terror. Discovering the neighbor's new pitbull, for example.

    3. what sort of preparation should be made before writing a novel

    Good running shoes.

    4. how should you develop narritve characters

    By talking to the paramedics rushing you to the hospital. Copy their personalities.

    5. what elements does a good prologue need

    A long, detailed description of what a pitbull can do to human limbs.

    6. in your opinion what perspective is easier to write from

    Preferably that of a talented surgeon.

    7. how should a writer go about world building

    Post-surgery opiates are best opiates. Use those.

    8. how much should a new writer write in a single sitting

    Oh, I'd say as long as it takes 'till the bandages come off. A couple months or so.

    9. what age group would aim a fantasy novel at

    Young enough that they think the giant, slobbering dragon is actually a dragon and not your recurring PTSD flashbacks in written form.

    10. what type of publishing would you use for a new auther

    One with a really good spellchecker.

    Author of Price.
  14. Sharkerbob (Member)

    Posted 5 months ago

    1. How would you start a novel?

    Months of mental anguish, then a sudden burst of inspiration.

    2. What methods are good for getting inspiration?

    Stressing yourself out for not writing until you either write or put a shotgun in your mouth and blow your brains out. Either way, the thoughts leave your brain, but I can't afford a shotgun, so I eventually end up writing.

    3. what sort of preparation should be made before writing a novel

    An outline helps.

    4. how should you develop narritve characters

    I let them write themselves, mostly.

    5. what elements does a good prologue need

    You shouldn't really need one, but it should be short and to the point if it's in there.

    6. in your opinion what perspective is easier to write from

    Third mostly-limited.

    7. how should a writer go about world building

    One block at a time.

    8. how much should a new writer write in a single sitting

    Until the flesh flays off your finger bones.

    9. what age group would aim a fantasy novel at

    Well, my fantasies are usually erotic, so, at least after they've learned to read.

    10. what type of publishing would you use for a new auther

    Self, on the internet. Its the only way to be sure.

    My meager offerings: http://sharkerbob.blogspot.com/

Reply »

You must log in to post.