Writing a web novel

2 months ago | Muspel (Member)

Hello,

I want to start writing a web novel but I'm still an amateur and I don't really know what to do. I found some people in these forums with great success, having a blog with a solid patreon account.

Once you have some fame I think that isn't difficult to run your own blog as the main platform for your writings but for someone who's just starting like, me what's the best option?

I could start a blog and set a patreon account but people will not find my blog. Doing some research I found some websites like Royal Road which I think it's decent but I also found some people saying that isn't good. Not sure what's the truth, they own your novel?

Writing is a hobby but I want to make it a full-time job, without dreams we have nothing, right? Even if I don't have any experience, you can't buy it and the only way to get it is by doing it, so here I am.

What should I do? I know that even if I do everything properly my novel must be good and I understand but I need to know exactly how to start and get noticed. I really like the idea of having a profitable blog where I post my works but to start with seems to be quite a difficult task because people will not be able to find my blog and I'm not very good promoting content with social media, even more knowing that I have a job and some other projects so I don't really have the time to be on social media with 5 different accounts trying to build a community there.

That's the main reason why I want to grow and quit some of my projects so I can spend more time writing. A lot of people can share their opinion but most of the times they don't know what they're talking about. I would love to read real feedback from someone making money writing web novels or getting awesome results.

Also, how many chapters a week should I post as a minimum? How many words? Any other thing that I should take a consideration?

If you find any grammar issue I apology, English isn't my main language but I'm doing the best I can to improve. Anything would be helpful since I don't have experience and I'm stuck thinking what should I do before writing. Any writing tip is welcome as well.

Thanks a lot for your time and valuable knowledge, I hope to learn something from you guys!

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Responses

  1. TanaNari (Member)

    Posted 2 months ago

    "I want to start writing a web novel but I'm still an amateur and I don't really know what to do. I found some people in these forums with great success, having a blog with a solid patreon account."

    ... What's your skill level? Be honest, are you going to write solid, clean stories with a reliable quality and pace? If so, you can move on to the next step.

    If not? Start with something easier. Fanfiction's a good way to get in some practice, build a reader base, and get lots of suggestions for improving your work. Highly recommended.

    "Once you have some fame I think that isn't difficult to run your own blog as the main platform for your writings but for someone who's just starting like, me what's the best option?"

    Having a blog or not won't be all that huge an impact, really. You'll want to find a way to advertise no matter what you do (networking with other authors or amateur writers is a great start). But I do recommend you keep your own blog if solely to have a clean, reliable place to store your works.

    There's nothing preventing you from updating your own website as well as somewhere like Royal Road.

    Author of Price.
  2. ScreamingCandle (Member)

    Posted 2 months ago

    Hi.

    I'm of two minds on this. First bit is that if you feel like writing, do just that... write. Don't worry at this point about who owns what because it's not important. You will always own your words, at least in American and most English speaking countries. Just do it and go bananas.

    BUT

    If you want to write well, if you want to write something people will want to invest their time in reading, then that's work. And you recognize that your grammar needs work. That's a good start.

    I've now been putting out The Strange since February. I too stink to high heaven at social media and have a day job. And as such, I'm getting zeroes daily. But - if I do all the social media stuff great and my things are not there or are terrible all that work is for nothing.

    I think of putting the horse in front of the cart and not the other way around. Your writing - the quality of the writing - that is what is going to drive repeated visits to your site. It is also by writing that your writing will improve - though personally I invested in an online grammar course that I found immensely helpful and early on I went to fanstory.com to get beaten up for a while with feedback. If you are in this for the long haul, start by writing. It's very easy to get distracted. The other things can wait.

    My two cents.

    "It is not important what you do, but it is critically important that you do it." - Terrence McKenna
    The Strange Updating Wednesdays
  3. unice5656 (Member)

    Posted 2 months ago

    #1 is obviously writing quality. Without that, no matter how many people find you, they won't come back.

    Once you have that, it's about exposure. You don't lose the rights to your story if you post to places like Royal Road and FictionPress. I've had some bad experiences with Inkitt (they edited my writing without my consent and informed me about it afterwards), so I don't recommend it.

    That being said, I only have experience gaining readers. Becoming a full-time writer is definitely not my goal, so I have no experience monetizing this process.

  4. Muspel (Member)

    Posted 2 months ago

    @TanaNari Well, I'm not sure. I am confident but surely not a professional. You can play football quite well with your friends but playing in a real team isn't the same thing.

    Ok, Royal Road is a good place, thanks!

    @ScreamingCandle Thanks for your advice mate, I appreciate your time.

    @unice5656 I suppose I will do it and see what happens.

    I'm having a difficult time picking up last names and names for my characters. I'm using a lot of Chinese and Japanese mythology so I feel like adding names related to them. I like the Japanese last names because they always mean something. In my universe, you can find families, clans, sects, etc. All of them have a different symbol, that's a good idea for last names if I find a good Japanese word with their meaning.

    The thing is that most translators out there are just crap like Google translator. If any of you have a good site or something where I can translate, let me know.

  5. unice5656 (Member)

    Posted 2 months ago

    If it's just single words you want to translate, try an online Japanese-English dictionary rather than a translator.

  6. Blaise Corvin (Member)

    Posted 2 months ago

    There's already some really good advice here. I don't have much to add.

    I guess my general advice to anyone new is:

    1. Be prepared to work your ass off.
    2. Be good at what you do.
    3. Have thick skin.
    4. Be good at promotion.
    5. Do your own goddamn research.
    6. Be disciplined.
    7. Accept you will spend as much time (or more) learning the business as you do actually writing.
    8. Accept that writing for money is exactly like owning your own small business.

    If you can't accept any one of these, just give up on writing for profit. It's not for everyone. It's really easy to say, "Follow your dreams regardless of anything else! *hugs*" However, oftentimes, the people saying this are folks who haven't made any money yet and view writing as a form of validation or a social club.

    The reality is that being a successful author, especially transitioning from a serial, is a lot of work and can be soul crushing at times.

    Just like succeeding in any creative endeavor, you need to want it. You need to want it bad.

    I get PMs sometimes from people asking how to be a successful indie author. Oftentimes when I tell them they'll have to work long hours every week on writing, give up sleep, and learn the ins and outs of the business, they just disappear.

    There are no shortcuts to success unless you're born rich. And most overnight successes, aren't.

    Visit my site, http://www.blaise-corvin.com. I have punch and pie.
    I also have two stories: Delvers LLC and The Crimson Artifice. :)
  7. Muspel (Member)

    Posted 2 months ago

    @unice5656 Thanks, I came out with some good ideas for names.

    @Blaise Corvin I agree with you mate, thanks for the advice. Any business out there, at least an online business or some kind of freelance job demands effort, passion and a lot of work.

    I can't compare myself with a good professional but I see it as a YouTube channel where most 1st videos were absolute trash and today they create brilliant content with amazing quality, all because of experience.

    Having a challenge is quite a motivation, I can practice English at the same time while I learn new words.

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