Writing web fiction that isn't super hero based?

4 months ago | LambentTyto (Member)

Writing super heroes isn't my thing. I like writing fantasy. Heroic fantasy, epic fantasy, fantasy with thriller pacing, and space opera style fantasy, but nothing with super heroes. Would a serial that isn't YA and not based on super heroes work?

My plan has always been to write short novels of around 40-60K a pop and throw them up on Amazon. I'm interested in writing stand alone works and series stories, so I figure if I'm doing this, I might as well throw the chapters up on the net as a serial for wider pull, plus I love the idea of interacting closely with fans and readers. If people want to read the novels, they can buy them off Amazon and other digital retailers. If they want to read for free, they can read the serialized releases, and if they want, can support me later by buying the books or putting something toward a future Patreon should I make it that far.

To me, releasing a serial is just a win win if I'm going to be indie publishing anyway, but that lack of super hero/YA appeal in my writing might just make it a waste of time, no?

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Page: 12

Responses

  1. ubersoft (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    Yes, it will work. My most successful serial was a space opera.

    Curveball (Updating)
    A Rake by Starlight (Updating)
  2. LambentTyto (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    Can you tell me more? You have a cool website, by the way.

  3. Sharkerbob (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    While superheroes are hot stuff currently, fantasy is still much more broadly popular, so I don't think you'll have much of an issue there.

  4. smatthews65 (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    I certainly hope so! Otherwise I’ve got a long and lonely road ahead :). Write the story you want to tell...people will follow.

    Mists of Kel Doran Online Novel
    http://www.mistsofkeldoran.com/novel
  5. Dary (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    I mean, webfiction has been around as long as the internet, and in that time there have been a number of successful serials - some even making the transition to traditional publishing, even Hollywood. Superheroes are just one of the fads there have been over the years. Something will come along to replace it, sooner or later - perhaps already is!

  6. Rhodeworks (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    Like smatthews65 says, write what you want to write. However, I'm not sure how well web fiction does when it doesn't operate firmly within the tropes and trappings of young adult fiction (off the top of my head: young protagonist, corrupt/dystopian society, ineffective/absent parents/authority figures, happy ending, simple prose). While I haven't read all of the Top 20 on TWF, I feel comfortable saying that they all lean towards it, if not operate safely within it.

    That's not to say you'll do badly and/or won't find readers, but I think tone matters much more than genre.

  7. LambentTyto (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    But I write adult, lol. Though I am interested in YA!

  8. LambentTyto (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    I guess at the end of the day if I'm indie publishing on digital platforms like Amazon, if the serialized posts never take off, it's not like it's going to hurt me. It's simply another basket I'd like to put out there. But yeah, write what you want. I love this answer.

  9. DrewHayes (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    While I'm not active in the serial world anymore, I can speak to the Amazon side of the question pretty well, and there's definitely no reason to limit yourself to superheroes on that front. While they were white-hot a few years ago, they've been cooling a bit as other genres become the new market wave. That's not to say you can't or shouldn't work with them (I just started a new superhero series last year) only that they aren't as market dominant as before. Chasing the current trend would get tiring anyway, so I'll echo what the others said with "write what you want." On a platform that big, there's a market for nearly genre.

    Super Powereds & Corpies
    http://www.DrewHayesNovels.com/
  10. LambentTyto (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    I checked out your website. Looks like you're seeing some success. Your novels have a lot of good reviews and the NPCs book is grabbing quite a bit of my interest. I might have to grab that, haha.

    Why'd you get out of doing serials? I guess publishing on Amazon and such generally sees a lot more success, right?

  11. DrewHayes (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    It wasn't so much about the success difference as it was wanting to try something new. At the end of SP, I'd been doing serials for nearly a decade with very few breaks, so I was definitely up for taking a breather. On top of that, I wanted to get more aggressive with my publishing schedule and take on fresh projects, none of which synced up well with the constant posting requirements of a serial. I loved doing them, and I think one day when I have the right story I'll probably do another, just not where I'm at in my career at the moment.

    Super Powereds & Corpies
    http://www.DrewHayesNovels.com/
  12. ubersoft (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    Thanks Lambent! The first serial I ever did was Pay Me, Bug! (which is still on the site) and it by far generated more interest and traffic than anything I've done since. It is a flat-out, unapologetic space opera.

    A lot of people post superhero serials because that's what they want to write. In the end it really isn't more complicated than that -- there are considerations that get piled on top of "what do you want to write" but if there's someone out there who is writing a superhero serial because they think it's the most marketable way to succeed in life there are a number of serious flaws in the assumptions that lead to that conclusion. :-)

    I started Curveball because I read Legion of Nothing and a few others and I got an idea for a story. I think that's a common reason why genres grow. A while back it was zombie serials. Before that it was more fantasy-ish.

    There's a lot of room to play in.

    Curveball (Updating)
    A Rake by Starlight (Updating)
  13. LambentTyto (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    Ah, I gotcha. What I want to do is basically post the chapters from the novels I'll be putting up on Amazon and such. I'll be writing them anyway, so I might as well post them, but I've been reading how key consistency is. Nearly ten years. That's a really long time!

  14. LambentTyto (Member)

    Posted 4 months ago

    Definitely a lot of trends. I'm okay tweaking my stuff in a generalized direction or format, but hard format conventions I'm not even interested in. But I wonder about post size and frequency. I like to post pretty beefy chapters. I could settle for around five thousand words a chapter, but I'm really more partial to ten or even fifteen thousand words. It's part of what I like about light novels, they're broken up, usually into about five chapters for the whole book. Of course, when posting chapters that are ten or fifteen thousand words, that means posting twice a month, or even once a month. I wonder if that could work. It doesn't seem to be the norm as far as posting habits go.

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