Hi. I'm New.

Hello. I'm new here. I came over from Writers Beat where I was in a discussion about the word blovel. I like to write blovels, and I'm starting one on Halloween. I guess I should list it here, yes? You can check out the blog shell it will go in at Gordon's Ghosts. If you have any suggestions please let me know.


I look forward to reading some of the blovels that are listed here.


Take care,


Edward


You know, of all the names for what we do, "blovel" is probably the most horrible-sounding word ever. ;)


I laughed out loud.


The scary thing is, I can see 'blovel' taking off. Self-descriptive enough that you can guess what it means even without knowing the medium, distinct, succinct.


Welcome, Edward G.


my inner 13 year old keeps giggling whenever I read "blovel."


There. My co-workers are staring at me nervously now.


Welcome Edward!


my inner 13 year old keeps giggling whenever I read "blovel."


There. My co-workers are staring at me nervously now.


Welcome Edward!


LOL.


Unfortunately, there's really no other word that is widely known. One could say "serial fiction" but a blovel is not a serialized novel. It becomes one in the end, but it is written on the fly, with the author having only a general idea what the story and characters are as he or she posts on a daily basis. A novel that is cut and pasted into a blog is not really a blovel, it's a serialized novel, like Dickens would have done.


Bloveling, I believe, will become it's own literary art form, since there are good and bad ways to blovel. Bloveling takes a certain skill that is different from novel writing. For instance, each post has to end with suspense, reader comments are considered, and the story may go in a new direction because of them.


I have to get off my soapbox now, or I never will. Thanks for having me in your forum.


Ed


I'd never heard "blovel" before today. When I think of what you describe I just think "webfiction," which is probably less specific than you're going for.


I just googled the word.


How crazy. It is apparently used by some people at least. It's strange to think that I've been doing it for years now, and have heard a wide variety of words for this, but somehow missed that one.


I just googled the word.


How crazy. It is apparently used by some people at least. It's strange to think that I've been doing it for years now, and have heard a wide variety of words for this, but somehow missed that one.


Since January 3, 2006, to be exact. :)


I think the "bl(og)" component of blovel leads me down the path of thinking that the format of a blovel would be the modern equivalent of an epistolary novel, but from what you're saying Edward G, it is literally as broad as any novel delivered in over time via a blogging platform (with certain other shared characteristics around length of posts etc).


I don't know what I think "bloveling" is, but the word does make me a bit uncomfortable for my personal safety. Like it is the hip new thing the kids are doing now that planking is over. Is the best place to blovel in a hovel? Did Vaclav Havel like to blovel? Can you blovel with a shovel? OK I'm done.


The Wikipedia article is very interesting! And to answer your original question, yes I definitely think you should list your blovel on WFG. There are already a bunch of stories there which would qualify as blovels under the "a rose by any other name" principle. ;)


I think the "bl(og)" component of blovel leads me down the path of thinking that the format of a blovel would be the modern equivalent of an epistolary novel, but from what you're saying Edward G, it is literally as broad as any novel delivered in over time via a blogging platform (with certain other shared characteristics around length of posts etc).


I don't know what I think "bloveling" is, but the word does make me a bit uncomfortable for my personal safety. Like it is the hip new thing the kids are doing now that planking is over.


LOL!


Is the best place to blovel in a hovel? Did Vaclav Havel like to blovel? Can you blovel with a shovel? OK I'm done.


The Wikipedia article is very interesting! And to answer your original question, yes I definitely think you should list your blovel on WFG. There are already a bunch of stories there which would qualify as blovels under the "a rose by any other name" principle. ;)


Again, LOL. But really is there another name for the rose? "Serialized Web Fiction" is long and it's not really the same thing. A blovel is written in a blog, it's not a novel cut and pasted onto a blog. Huge difference, IMO.


I have heard blovel before (generally from people who stopped using is) but I prefer web fiction, weblit or web serial. Blovel is a really awkward portmanteau and assumes the serial noveller is using a blogging platform. Not everyone does.


While "blovel" is fun, and I'm going to start using it, the most searched term for online serial fiction is: "online book", or "online novel". (Actually "webserial" beats that, but only because most people use it to mean video serials.)


Just a little SEO geekery for your info.... according to Google Adwords' keyword tool:


"online book" is searched for around 4 million times a month

"serial novel" just over 1000 times a month

"blovel" 140 a month


Are the people looking for "online book" looking for a serial? Maybe not specifically, "download novel" gets about 2 million searches. And "read online" and similar terms get a hit of over million themselves. (Of course, serial novel overlaps a lot with searches for novels about serial killers too.)


That's one thing about blovel -- if someone searches for it, you know what they're searching for!


Camille


Again, LOL. But really is there another name for the rose? "Serialized Web Fiction" is long and it's not really the same thing. A blovel is written in a blog, it's not a novel cut and pasted onto a blog. Huge difference, IMO.


I agree! But I would argue that if blovel is a sub-genre of what we would call web fiction (i.e. in its broadest form, original fiction primarily intended to be read on the web), there are a bunch of stories on WfG - not all of them - that would qualify as blovels, even if their authors don't call them that. :)

Welcome to WFG!


I did a few google trends searches (similar to Camille) -- see http://red-bird.org/2012/10/05/branding-what-i-do-as-a-webfiction-and-webserial-is-a-bad-idea/


Chucked in "blovel" to boot after taking out another term to make room.


http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=online%20novel%2C%20%22web%20fiction%22%2C%20webfiction%2C%20light%20novel%2C%20blovel&cmpt=q


IT's interesting to me to see this insistence on terminology that readers aren't searching for. I feel like after looking at the data that all of us writing "serials" or "webfiction" have been missing the boat.


BTW, when you take out any of the terms in the above link and put in "ebook" it flattens all other lines . (http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=online%20novel%2C%20webfiction%2C%20light%20novel%2C%20blovel%2C%20ebook&cmpt=q)


ETA: Then add "online book" and yeah - it's no contest. Everything else is pretty sad. http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=online%20novel%2C%20webfiction%2C%20light%20novel%2C%20ebook%2C%20online%20book&cmpt=q


We are losing the keyword war!


No, we're not losing the keyword war!


Remember these things when thinking about SEO:


1.) There are different ways they count the words, so for instance with the keyword tool gives two numbers, the global hits and the local hits. Local tends to be more accurate - and it's always MUCH lower than the global. (I'll be honest and say I'm lazy, and haven't really looked into what they measure with each.)


2.) There is a sweet spot for searching. A bazillion searches mean a term is vague, and most of the time the searchers are not looking for YOU. The actual best place to be in the ability to match the searcher up with the searched is somewhere in the 10,000 to 100,000 range. 1000 to 10,000 is not bad if you don't have a lot of competition. From 100,000 to maybe 500,000 is a rich keyword, but not something you'll have an easy time ranking for, so best to use it as a kind of base term, and brainstorm more specific terms to aim at.


3.) Google doesn't go with exact keywords anyway. Not any more. They have algorithms that are smart about related terms. So if blovel gets used much in a context that shows the algorithm that it's related to web fiction and serialized fiction and blog stories ("blog story" is also a nice ranking keyword), the search engine will assume use of the word "blovel" is of interest to people searching on those other terms.


Camille


True - it's bad to be in a big pool with a lot of matches. Certainly one would get lost in "ebook" or "free book" quite easily without the additional narrowing down. (And I hate "serial" because most people hunting "serials" could be looking for "serial cracks" aka passcodes.)


However, what does worry me about the trend data is that "webfiction" doesn't really even perk up after news media uses the term. (Granted, the media flags appeared to be in French, so it could be that w/i France there may be an upsurge.)


I don't really know that "webfiction" per se is a good gateway entry term. One almost has to be acculturated to the term to even search for it. (In my case, a friend told me about this site. First time I ever saw "webfiction" was in the site name.)


It's likely the law of seven. The brand needs to be hammered at people a bit more before they start using it.


That's fine... no brand is known at first. We just need to make sure they keep seeing the words we want them to associate with what they're looking for when they search for it. (Easier said than done of course).


For what it's worth I see the WFG number 1 for "online novels" but I'm not sure if Google is personalising my results because I don't see that on Bing. Could other people check?


Most of my search traffic is people looking for me but I get a fair few people arriving by searching for such things as "online fantasy about dragons" or "online fantasy fiction" or similar.


I think that it may have shown up first because of your circle. If you're logged into a Google account, the search profile behaves differently for you depending on who you're linked with. If you mostly talk to other authors who have a thread through "webfiction" you will see WFG much higher up.


As for me, doesn't show up... about twenty pages in and don't see a hint of WFG, Muses, etc.


There is the WFG offshoot novel online IIRC (if someone can tell me the name, I'd appreciate it). I suspect that to get to the point where webfiction has a bit more play , the pass through from 'online novel' to 'webfiction' has to occur with more frequency.


Yeah that was my thought, that it had something to do with my activity.


In that sense Google Plus is an interesting tool to promotion. Obviously for those authors who have big circles, your influence on search results is a big deal.


This has been a very helpful thread btw. My special thanks to Camille. I think I see the light. Off plotting now some SEO games of my own. Will let you know when the experiment really begins. ;)