Passive Guy covers Seth Godin on Kickstarter for books | True Fans

Sigh. Well, attempted to stick foot in mouth and waiting now for my moderated comment to be passed through the queue:


http://www.thepassivevoice.com/01/2013/does-kickstarter-work-as-a-platform-for-books/


In sum, PG links to Seth Godin's blog about Kickstarter as a writer. He sort of skims along the surface in this post, but a previous one brought up the true fans concept.


True fans background reading:

http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2008/03/1000_true_fans.php

http://www.novelr.com/2009/04/28/rethinking-1000-true-fans (post at novelr)


If it was your first post, it's queued just so PG can make sure it's not spam. The only other time I was held in moderation there was when I posted a number of links, which tripped a "this might be a spambot" trigger. But he let it through.


I'm glad I didn't listen to any of these people at the beginning of the year or I wouldn't have used Kickstarter to release (and make money on) three novels. :,


Thanks Uber - I've tried to comment before but I always get stuck in that queue :/


MCA: PG's site does find good articles, but it does become an echo chamber sometimes. It's a pretty pro-Amazon site/anti traditional site overall... but there are some reallyg ood comments in there from time to time , particularly from DaringNovelist :3


And yeah - part of the reason I had to comment was because I've been watching you guys do fine with Kickstarter (while I watched a few other folks who didn't serialize that I know tank twice). KS can work for books, but not the way writers want (where they get everything up front). THe same rules that apply for comics holds quite true with books...


SgL, I've noticed the pro-Amazon thing a LOT. It drives me crazy. But what are ya gonna do?


Kickstarter can work for non-serial authors too, so long as they have a good sense of project management. My observation is that if they come from traditional publishing backgrounds, it feels like too much work... because it is! Compared to letting the publishers handle the productizing of the story. From my perspective, compared to not publishing the story at all (or worse, trying to scrounge up the money for it over the course of several years) it's quite reasonable! It's all a matter of perspective.


If you don't have practice with project management, it can really be a shock though. It's why I wrote that book on using Kickstarter, so people could avoid my mistakes. :,


UBer: I generally ignore the comments on a lot of the posts at that site now. I still look through the RSS notifications though but am not inclined to click as much as I used to. It seems like the blog is less about the legal stuff and self-publishing these days than random writing gossip. I tend to prefer/pay more attention to the blogs put out by the Dean Wesley/Kathrine Rusch duo because they try to strike a middle ground on the self vs. traditional debate (unlike Konrath/EIsler) and work whatever channels they think makes sense for the author.


MCA: Yeah, KS is actually a lot of work overall on front and back ends... never quite made the connection that KS would be perceived by authors as more work than what any creator would normally do. In art circles you do everything yourself!


To be honest though - I tend to fund mostly art stuff on KS.I can't go for writing projects unless I like the author as a cause or their product. A vast majority of boo kpitches aren't good though... I wince when going through the KS publishing category and tend to just fund comics.


I fund writing projects if I can see a sample of the text, which suggests that having it online (or attached in the Kickstarter description so people can read an excerpt) is a good idea.


I think I'm less generous. If the blurb fails to interest me based on the style, I'm less likely to fund a project


On the other hand, if the bid/pledge is low enough that I get a book out of it at 10-15 bucks I might just go for a pitch if it's interesting enough.


*checks*


Let's see. I have funded... seven fiction projects. Of those seven:


2 didn't fund, so I don't know what they would have been like.

2 were by people I already had read books by (one a web serial writer, one a traditional published author)

3 were by strangers. Of those three, I enjoyed 2 and the other wasn't to my taste.


So not too bad a batting average. By contrast I've only backed 5 web comics.