Where to find Editors?

Hello


What are the known methods of finding someone who would be willing to help edit web fiction? Is there something here, or on other websites?


I found Jessica Augustsson from an advertisement on another web fiction site and can personally recommend her

http://www.jessedit.com/sf.html


I have heard good things about Annetta Ribken http://www.wordwebbing.com


Both ladies offer Free sample edits.


I think efiction Magazine is offering free editing for stories submitted to them:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/31543189/eFiction-Magazine-May-2010


I do not know of anyone who does editing for free. If you find someone - please let me know :)


Eh, I'm not interested in professional level editing. I just thought that if there were amateur writers who write for fun, there should be some who like to read and edit as a hobby as well.


There's some resources listed here as well: http://weblit.us/services.


For a "hobby" level of editing, you can do what I did and post a request on your site/twitter/here/weblit.us/similar sites/etc. for what is essentially a "beta reader". In other words, someone who'll help you catch typos, dropped words, and confusing passages. In my case, I just asked for a one time read-through of my first dozen chapters, and only offered profuse thanks and crediting as compensation. For an on-going service, you would probably need to offer something a little more than just "thanks" unless you happen to find someone who really enjoys reading your work and doesn't mind doing it for free.


I think @shutsumon has that type of arrangement with @Inventrix, if you want to ask them how that's worked out (those are their twitter handles - I think they use the same names here, but not 100% sure on that).


Thank you for the link, capriox. A superb resource. It hasn't come up in searches, nor has digital novels.


regards

L.


Hm, what if we started a "buddy system" here?


We can have pairs, trios, or some other sort of small group where people beta each other's work in return for being beta'ed? Kind of like the review system, except that participants continually exchange edits as they advance their serial.


You might also want to check out some of the online critique groups: critiquecircle.com, or critters.org.


Second what Chris said. The buddy system you're describing sounds, Lekhaka, sounds almost exactly like a writer's circle/editing group/critique group. There's a bunch of those already established, so no point in re-inventing the wheel here. Google should help you find others if Chris' suggestions don't work for you.


Ah, so that's what it's called.


No, I didn't think I would be the first to come up with this idea. :-P


Yeah, @Invetrix is my beta reader and she's doing a great job for me. All I did was appeal on Twitter and she offered.


I think she has a beta for her web fiction "Philosopher's Society" as well.


Becka


Hm, I checked out critiquecircle and critters, but from what I read on the websites it doesn't seem too reliable. The only motivation to critique is to have credit for one's own work to be critiqued. Not that this is bad in itself, but these sites require certain number of critiques and I think most members would just try to write something without too much thought into the content. Though I could be mistaken, of course. Does anyone here have experience with these sites?


I think a good critique circle has to be small and intimate, so that trust and friendship are motivations on top of the benefit of getting your own work critiqued. Anonymity and impersonality on large sites seem to be untrustworthy.


And web serials seem to need this especially as they require consistent betas who are up to date with the story. Even if those larger critique sites do a decent job, I doubt it would work if one submitted a non-opening chapter for critique. The Critters site's solution for this seem to be "create your own personal group" that operates within the larger system of the site. CritiqueCircle seems to require one to create a private circle, but this requires payment which seems silly.


I guess the question I'm getting to is...


If I wanted to create/join a small critique group for web serials, can I look for members here? Some sites have rules about posting such requests, so I just want to know if I have permission from the moderators here.


I was on critiquecircle.com for about a year. Critiques ranged from useless to helpful, but were on average a bit better than the other groups I'd been in. To be honest, though, when it comes to critique groups, I've found you learn a lot more *writing* them for other people (people who are better writers than you) than you do from what other people write for you.


Chris.


Editing fiction is a good deal more than fishing out typos and flagging what's unclear. A professional editor may also recommend wholesale changes, actually make changes or otherwise have a determinative influence on the final result. Copy editing is much less intrusive. And therefore somewhat lower on the publishing totem pole. Both are respectable occupations and are ordinarily compensated. Anyone who finds someone of professional caliber willing to edit or copy-edit for free is likely to hear a caveat emptor in the back of her mind.


Then there are "real life" (not Internet) critique groups. Look for a local writers' group, or maybe check with a creative writing program. Another pair of eyes can be Very helpful, and some of those eyes can be invaluable. I found my group through a writer's society. We have some excellent problem-spotters.


Anyone who finds someone of professional caliber willing to edit or copy-edit for free is likely to hear a caveat emptor in the back of her mind.


As is usually the case with professionals, most do prefer to charge. But some of us have a friend or relative who happens to be an excellent auto mechanic, professional or otherwise, who is willing to work for free, or maybe for a beer. Same thing here. Find a not-famous writer who happens to be a good editor--there are some out there.


--Shelley


This may sound like an oddball thing to say, but editing doesn't accomplish much. It shows how someone else would write what you have written. The next thing you write will sound like you, not like your editor. It accomplishes much more to read your favorite author's book in bite-sized morsels, a page or two at a time, and each step of the way compare what he or she has accomplished with your own story at the same stage. You'll pick up pointers fast and furious. Take notes. Rewrite your entirely original material incorporating improvements 'suggested' by your author's writing, and then repeat the process. A good novel is like a dance. Dances are captivating when they are graceful and unexpectedly creative. Dance instructors do not TELL you how to dance. They SHOW you. You watch carefully, emulate, and then do your own thing. They don't have to know the service they are performing for you, although if they did, they'd take pride knowing that you chose them as your mentor. Ages ago, someone said you have to write a million words before you can expect to sell something. For me, anyhow, that proved to be a very accurate figure. Practice makes perfect? Should have said so to begin with, I guess. LOL?


Hm good tip. Thanks!


William Tedford wrote:This may sound like an oddball thing to say, but editing doesn't accomplish much. It shows how someone else would write what you have written. The next thing you write will sound like you, not like your editor. It accomplishes much more to read your favorite author's book in bite-sized morsels, a page or two at a time, and each step of the way compare what he or she has accomplished with your own story at the same stage. You'll pick up pointers fast and furious. Take notes. Rewrite your entirely original material incorporating improvements 'suggested' by your author's writing, and then repeat the process.


I hope the next thing I write sounds like me. Analyze other writers' work and see how they do what they do--sure. Try to copy them--to sound like them--no. Anyway, how many second/third/fourth-rate Kurt Vonneguts, Salman Rushdies, and Amy Tans do we really need?


Actually, a good editor is a reader--not necessarily a writer--who understands what you're trying to do and helps you to do it . . . without ending up sounding unlike yourself. You may come out sounding like a more organized or literate you, but not a copy of the editor or of anyone else.


Not all writers are good editors--of their own works especially--and as I noted above, not all good editors are writers. They're different skills. And since it's very hard to know how your work comes across to others--whether that crucial scene in Chapter Three was really clear, for instance--a reasonably good editor or beta reader is nearly always a good idea.


And don't get me started on typos and spellcheckers.


--Shelley


Wow, great tips everyone!



Anyway, I plan to find a support group for writing, or for people with low self esteem, whichever I happen upon first, I guess.

Thanks,

M. Abran

http://yourhiatus.com